Pichuberry Recipe

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While these berries may look small, they boast great nutritional value.  A great source of vitamin E, vitamin A, vitamin P, and the B-complex vitamins B1, B6, and B12. By eating only 3 ounces of this power fruit, you’ll meet 37 percent of your daily required vitamin A, 13 percent of your required niacin, 18 percent of your recommended vitamin C, and 39 percent of your vitamin D requirement. .

Pichuberries grow inside husks that assimilate small lanterns, as tomatillos do. Native to Peru, the Pichuberry is being grown here in Arizona.  In fact, the company is in collaboration with the University of Arizona, doing research on the crop.  Pichuberries are great in a variety of recipes from sweet to savory.  In fact, you may have already enjoyed Los Muertos Pichuberry Salsa or Iconic Cocktail’s Pichuberry mixer.

Carolina shares one of her favorite dinner recipes using this superfood.  Say hi to her Saturdays at the market and discover more recipes she’s cooking up at home.

“Read More” for Carolina’s Quinoa Salad Recipe

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Crop of the Week: Okra

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We love this image Hip Veggies (Monika Woolsey) captured.

 

  1. Okra is a member of the Mallow family, related to cotton, hibiscus and hollyhock.

2. In other parts of the world, this functional vegetable is also known as gumbo or lady fingers.

3. The pods, when cut, exude a mucilaginous juice that is used to thicken stews (like gumbo), and have a flavor somewhat like a cross between asparagus and eggplant.

4. Okra probably originated somewhere around Ethiopia, and was cultivated by the ancient Egyptians by the 12th century B.C.

5. Okra seeds have been toasted, ground and used a coffee substitute for centuries.

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The Importance of Bees

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  • Honey bees are accurately described as indispensable pollinators.  In the United States it is estimated that managed honey bee colonies are annually responsible for the pollination of agricultural crops valued between $4 and $8 billion.
  • Bees that are about 21 days old, begin to take short orientation flights, marking the beginning of a 2 to 3 week life as a forager bee, seeking nectar and pollen to bring back to the colony.
  •  While a worker bee is in a flower gathering nectar, pollen often sticks to her hairy body. Because the bee generally visits a number of the same type of flower, she will rub some of the pollen off onto another flower and complete pollination
  • During chillier seasons, worker bees can live for nine months. But in the summer, they rarely last longer than six weeks—they literally work themselves to death.
  • When aging bees do jobs usually reserved for younger members, their brain stops aging. In fact, their brain ages in reverse.

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This Week… Watermelon Juice

The watermelon from the market is so sweet and fresh! It’s a great salad addition, frozen snack and refreshing drink. We found this recipe for watermelon juice in anEdible Phoenix from 2009.

This week challenge yourself to making watermelon juice for the house. Add different herbs like mint or basil for extra flavor. Or try this delicious cocktail from Scaling Back Blog.

Share your favorite market recipes and we’ll post them on our blog!  We love to get inspired by different dishes.

 

Crop of the Week: Cherries

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1. The word ‘cherry’ comes from the Turkish town of Cerasus.

2. Cherries belong to the rose family.

3. The English colonists brought cherries to North America in the 1600’s.

4. Canada holds the record for baking the biggest cherry pie in the world. A pie weighing 39,683 pounds was baked in Oliver, British Columbia.

5. Cherries are a small source of zinc; and moderate sources of iron, potassium, and manganese; and good source of copper. Potassium is a heart-healthy mineral; an important component of cell and body fluids that regulate heart rate and blood pressure.

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The Importance of Crop Diversity

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Native Seeds/SEARCH is a vital leader in the Southwest region for conserving and promoting crop diversity to strengthen community resilience and food security.  The mission of Native Seeds/SEARCH (Southwestern Endangered Aridland Resources Clearing House) is to conserve, distribute, and document the adapted and diverse varieties of agricultural seeds, their wild relatives and the role these seeds play in cultures of the American Southwest and northwest Mexico.

Crop diversity is key to achieving sustainable food security both globally and within our own region of focus, the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico. NS/S approach to food security focuses on seed security, which relies on the conservation and sharing of appropriate crop diversity and the knowledge to use that diversity effectively. Their programs are designed to address these goals and broadly entail:

  • Seed banking to ensure the survival of unique agricultural biodiversity and to document its traits.
  • Seed distribution so that these crops continue to contribute to the region’s food systems.
  • Support for on-farm maintenance of dynamically-evolving crop varieties.
  • Research into low-input and climate-appropriate agricultural practices.
  • Education in managing local crop diversity and contributing to regional efforts.

Learn more this weekend at the market where we will be hosting Native Seeds/SEARCH for a FREE workshop starting at 9am.

Find more ways to get involved with their organization here: http://www.nativeseeds.org/get-involved

Vendor Profile: Chile Acres

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Meet Celia Petersen, the hardworking woman behind Chile Acres farms in Tonopah, Arizona. She and her family have been working the property for over 30-years and have been bringing their goods to the market since 2005 when we opened.  Growing up with allergies to cow’s dairy, it was natural for her and her family to raise goats and produce milk and cheeses.  Being sensitive to varieties of allergies, Celia has handcrafted all-natural recipes from goats milk soaps to gluten free baked goods.  Chile Acres isn’t only home to goats, all day Celia is out tending to her ducks, geese, chickens, horses, donkey and sheep.  Of course, with the help of her dogs.  When she isn’t taking care of all of the animals or in the kitchen, she’s busy making wooly stuff, dying the fibers with natural ingredients, creating tapestries on her loom or making her famous fry bread tacos.  Stop by Chile Acres booth and say hi to Celia.  You can often find her spinning wool at the market, meet the newest kids and ask her about raising animals in Arizona.

Read More to see images from our visit!

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Crop of the Week: Cilantro

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1. Also called coriander, Chinese parsley and Mexican parsley, cilantro has a strong, sage, citrus
flavor that many find irresistible. In general, herbs should be fresh looking, crisp and brightly colored.
2. Cilantro is probably one of the first herbs to be used by mankind, perhaps going back as far back
as 5000 BC. It is mentioned in early Sanskrit writings dating from about 1500 BC. The Romans spread it throughout Europe, and it was one of the first spices to arrive in America.
3.The leaves have a very different taste from the seeds. Some people instead perceive an unpleasant “soapy” taste and/or a rank smell. This perception is believed to be a result of an enzyme
that changes the way they taste cilantro, a genetic trait, but has yet to be fully studied.
4. Cilantro has been used as a folk medicine for the relief of anxiety and insomnia in Iranian folk
medicine.

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What’s In Season: Summer

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Click the image above to read more seasonal articles, recipes and farmer features from Edible Phoenix

Market Recipe: Pesto Potato Salad

Market Recipe: Pesto Potato Saladpotato-salad-recipe

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