This Week… Watermelon Juice

The watermelon from the market is so sweet and fresh! It’s a great salad addition, frozen snack and refreshing drink. We found this recipe for watermelon juice in anEdible Phoenix from 2009.

This week challenge yourself to making watermelon juice for the house. Add different herbs like mint or basil for extra flavor. Or try this delicious cocktail from Scaling Back Blog.

Share your favorite market recipes and we’ll post them on our blog!  We love to get inspired by different dishes.

 

Crop of the Week: Cherries

Screen Shot 2016-07-07 at 1.05.56 PM

1. The word ‘cherry’ comes from the Turkish town of Cerasus.

2. Cherries belong to the rose family.

3. The English colonists brought cherries to North America in the 1600’s.

4. Canada holds the record for baking the biggest cherry pie in the world. A pie weighing 39,683 pounds was baked in Oliver, British Columbia.

5. Cherries are a small source of zinc; and moderate sources of iron, potassium, and manganese; and good source of copper. Potassium is a heart-healthy mineral; an important component of cell and body fluids that regulate heart rate and blood pressure.

Read the full story »

The Importance of Crop Diversity

Web-NSS-Logo

Native Seeds/SEARCH is a vital leader in the Southwest region for conserving and promoting crop diversity to strengthen community resilience and food security.  The mission of Native Seeds/SEARCH (Southwestern Endangered Aridland Resources Clearing House) is to conserve, distribute, and document the adapted and diverse varieties of agricultural seeds, their wild relatives and the role these seeds play in cultures of the American Southwest and northwest Mexico.

Crop diversity is key to achieving sustainable food security both globally and within our own region of focus, the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico. NS/S approach to food security focuses on seed security, which relies on the conservation and sharing of appropriate crop diversity and the knowledge to use that diversity effectively. Their programs are designed to address these goals and broadly entail:

  • Seed banking to ensure the survival of unique agricultural biodiversity and to document its traits.
  • Seed distribution so that these crops continue to contribute to the region’s food systems.
  • Support for on-farm maintenance of dynamically-evolving crop varieties.
  • Research into low-input and climate-appropriate agricultural practices.
  • Education in managing local crop diversity and contributing to regional efforts.

Learn more this weekend at the market where we will be hosting Native Seeds/SEARCH for a FREE workshop starting at 9am.

Find more ways to get involved with their organization here: http://www.nativeseeds.org/get-involved

Vendor Profile: Chile Acres

IMG_6459

Meet Celia Petersen, the hardworking woman behind Chile Acres farms in Tonopah, Arizona. She and her family have been working the property for over 30-years and have been bringing their goods to the market since 2005 when we opened.  Growing up with allergies to cow’s dairy, it was natural for her and her family to raise goats and produce milk and cheeses.  Being sensitive to varieties of allergies, Celia has handcrafted all-natural recipes from goats milk soaps to gluten free baked goods.  Chile Acres isn’t only home to goats, all day Celia is out tending to her ducks, geese, chickens, horses, donkey and sheep.  Of course, with the help of her dogs.  When she isn’t taking care of all of the animals or in the kitchen, she’s busy making wooly stuff, dying the fibers with natural ingredients, creating tapestries on her loom or making her famous fry bread tacos.  Stop by Chile Acres booth and say hi to Celia.  You can often find her spinning wool at the market, meet the newest kids and ask her about raising animals in Arizona.

Read More to see images from our visit!

Read the full story »

Crop of the Week: Cilantro

bunch-of-cilantro

1. Also called coriander, Chinese parsley and Mexican parsley, cilantro has a strong, sage, citrus
flavor that many find irresistible. In general, herbs should be fresh looking, crisp and brightly colored.
2. Cilantro is probably one of the first herbs to be used by mankind, perhaps going back as far back
as 5000 BC. It is mentioned in early Sanskrit writings dating from about 1500 BC. The Romans spread it throughout Europe, and it was one of the first spices to arrive in America.
3.The leaves have a very different taste from the seeds. Some people instead perceive an unpleasant “soapy” taste and/or a rank smell. This perception is believed to be a result of an enzyme
that changes the way they taste cilantro, a genetic trait, but has yet to be fully studied.
4. Cilantro has been used as a folk medicine for the relief of anxiety and insomnia in Iranian folk
medicine.

Read the full story »

What’s In Season: Summer

Screen Shot 2016-06-01 at 11.16.18 AM

Click the image above to read more seasonal articles, recipes and farmer features from Edible Phoenix

Market Recipe: Pesto Potato Salad

Market Recipe: Pesto Potato Saladpotato-salad-recipe

Read More for the Recipe

Read the full story »

Crop of the Week: Carrots

13109067_514307322103498_559294527_n
1. The carrot originated some 5000 years ago in Middle Asia around Afghanistan, and slowly spread into the Mediterranean area.
2. The first carrots were white, purple, red, yellow, green and black – not orange.
3. Carrots were first grown as a medicine not a food.
4. Researchers at the USDA found that those who consumed 2 carrots a day were able to lower their cholesterol levels about 20 percent due to a soluble fiber found in carrots called calcium pectate.

Read the full story »

Market Recipe: Grilled Romaine with Corn Salad

Grilled Romaine and Corn Salad

8be2eab6a0f665e7f0ef6ba1825abd54

Read more for the full recipe Read the full story »

Crop of the Week: Squash Blossoms

Squash_Blossom_ppmKeep your eyes out for Squash Blossoms starting to pop up around the market!

Squash blossoms are the flowers produced by any number of vines. Some common examples are zucchini, pumpkin, and other various types of squash. Although considered a vegetable in culinary circles, squash are technically a fruit. Stuff the blossoms with cheese – savory or sweet – and then bake them in the oven.

Check out this Ricotta-Stuffed Squash Blossoms featured in Bon Appetite Magazine