Abby Lee Farms

abbylee

Last week we went to meet the growers behind Abby Lee Farms and see their greenhouse operation located less than 7 miles from the Phoenix Public Market.  Specializing in hydroponic tomatoes and cucumbers we were blown away by their 120,000 Sq Ft high-tech growing facility.  Using coconut fiber grow bags and strategic watering equipment, they use significantly less water than traditional growing techniques.  In order to manage the extreme conditions of Phoenix weather, going from frosts to extreme heat – they go off of a tried and true system.  When you’re hot and want to put on a hat, your plants are probably feeling the same way and it’s time to coat the greenhouses with shading paints.

We highly recommend a taste test of the many varieties of tomatoes Abby Lee offers. Grab one of each, slice them up, taste the differences and share your favorite by tagging us on instagram @phxpublicmarket

Read more to meet Neal Brooks & his various growing locations:

image1

Read the full story »

Green Living in the Desert

IMG_3345_130725At the Phoenix Public Market we are dedicated to sustainable living and embracing our natural environment here in the desert.  Our mission is to encourage and inform our community about the benefits of a simpler lifestyle and to teach the importance of protecting our natural environment.  Sustainable living can seem overwhelming at times, but can actually make your life easier and help you save money.   Taking a look at our current lifestyles and making small changes can go a long way.  We are here to support those steps.

In the desert start with reducing our waste, eating native foods and harvesting water.   Read more to discover where to begin, what you can learn at the market and how to support a Greener Desert.

Also, this weekend check out our workshop: Harvesting Nopal.  More details here.

Read the full story »

Learning About I’itoi Onions

12677350_234948473509626_2002222766_nLast week we had the privileged to go to Crooked Sky Farms and get the full tour of what’s growing from Farmer Frank himself!  One of his favorite pieces of produce out in his fields right now is the I’itoi onion.

So what is an I’itoi onion?

“These wildly popular and prolific multiplier onions resemble the wild onions harvested on I’itoi Mountain, also known as Baboquivari Mountain, by Tohono O’odham people. Botanical studies place the I’itoi onion among a very old line of clumping onions brought to the US by Jesuit missionaries in the late 17th century, concluding that the onion is not necessarily a US native. Today they are eagerly sought out by chefs for their mild shallot-like bulbs and slightly spicy greens. The peppery flavor pairs well with Southwestern cuisine. They are very easy to cultivate and in the low-desert will grow in response to both winter and summer rains.  In cooler regions their growth is in the summer. Rarely flowers and set seeds; propagate by division of the bulbs. When the greens dry down dig up the bulbs and divide. Enjoy some but be sure to save a few for your next planting. The name I’itoi signifies the Elder Brother, who is the creator deity in Tohono O’odham legends.” – Native Seeds/SEARCH

Want to learn more about native produce and how to acquire it to grow yourself?  Check out our friends at Native Seeds/SEARCH.

Spring Workshop Series: Harvesting Nopal

healthy kids flyer

March 19: Harvesting Nopal Workshop & Demonstration

Monika Woolsey of Hip Veggies will be at the market teaching guests about Harvesting Nopal.

Did you know, there are over 1,000 edible plants in the Sonoran Desert? And that one of them, the prickly pear, or nopal, has been a staple vegetable in indigenous diets for centuries? Did you know this plant has been found to have multiple health benefits?  Come learn why Nopal is more than just a pretty landscaping face!

Pre-registration is required HERE A suggested donation of $10 can be made day of workshop.

This Spring learn about Harvesting in the Sonoran Desert at the Phoenix Public Market!  Mark for your calendars April 9th for our Harvesting Mesquite Workshop and Demonstration, with Kate Radosevic from Valley Permaculture Alliance.

Read the full story »

What is CSA?

Did you know most of our farmers offer CSA Programs? You can find more from Blue Sky Organic Farms , Crooked Sky Farms, Gila Farms, and Maya’s Farm.

a39ec0_50e04eadcd55440b896aec3b08a03908

So what is CSA? 

CSA Stands for Community Supported Agriculture. CSA allows city residents to have direct access to high quality, fresh produce grown locally by regional farmers. When you become a member of a CSA, you’re purchasing a “share” of vegetables from a regional farmer.  Typically the “share” consists of a box of seasonal produce each week throughout the farming season, but other farm products may be included.

This arrangement creates several rewards for both the farmer and the consumer.  Read More and learn how this benefits the farmers and consumers.

Read the full story »

Market Recipe: Arugala Pesto

Pesto is a favorite among pasta lovers, salad eaters and anyone that enjoys a flavorful, fresh and rich topping or sauce.  We love this twist on classic pesto, especially because we love all of the rich and spicy flavors in arugula.

Maya Daily of Maya’s Farm shares this favorite recipe.  Don’t miss out on Maya’s CSA Special offer this week.  Sign up for her CSA program and get $100 gift certificate.

arugula-pesto-3

Read the full story »

Market Recipe: Preserved Lemons

IMG_1612
Vendor Julie Leidel shares her favorite way to preserve fresh produce when it’s at its peak.
It’s Citrus Season!  Preserved Lemons – super easy to make, and gives a big flavor punch.  You can get beautiful lemons from any number of our produce vendors.  Pop on over to Salt Of The Earth for some sea salt and you’re good to go.  I typically put preserved lemons on fish and chicken.  They’re also great chopped up (rind and all) and added to rice or other grains.  If you’re feeling generous, they make a great gift for your friends who love to cook.

Read the full story »

Why Farmers Markets?

whymarkets_2015_page1

GMOs: Understanding the Difference

olmag.cogmo-foods

Consumer desire to avoid GMOs has fueled substantial growth in organic foodsand has helped to support local farmers’ markets like ours! When you shop at the Phoenix Public Market you know your food and the sources it comes from. Talk to your growers and producers about techniques they use to avoid GMOs and feel good about the fuel you feed your body!

Our farmers are committed to supporting GMO free foods. GMOs, or “genetically modified organisms,” are plants created through the gene splicing techniques of biotechnology. In the grocery store, approximately 80% of the items are made with GMOs. Studies have shown negative effects on both the human body and our environment due to GMOs.

Read the full story »