Vendor Profile: Chile Acres

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Meet Celia Petersen, the hardworking woman behind Chile Acres farms in Tonopah, Arizona. She and her family have been working the property for over 30-years and have been bringing their goods to the market since 2005 when we opened.  Growing up with allergies to cow’s dairy, it was natural for her and her family to raise goats and produce milk and cheeses.  Being sensitive to varieties of allergies, Celia has handcrafted all-natural recipes from goats milk soaps to gluten free baked goods.  Chile Acres isn’t only home to goats, all day Celia is out tending to her ducks, geese, chickens, horses, donkey and sheep.  Of course, with the help of her dogs.  When she isn’t taking care of all of the animals or in the kitchen, she’s busy making wooly stuff, dying the fibers with natural ingredients, creating tapestries on her loom or making her famous fry bread tacos.  Stop by Chile Acres booth and say hi to Celia.  You can often find her spinning wool at the market, meet the newest kids and ask her about raising animals in Arizona.

Read More to see images from our visit!

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Crop of the Week: Cilantro

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1. Also called coriander, Chinese parsley and Mexican parsley, cilantro has a strong, sage, citrus
flavor that many find irresistible. In general, herbs should be fresh looking, crisp and brightly colored.
2. Cilantro is probably one of the first herbs to be used by mankind, perhaps going back as far back
as 5000 BC. It is mentioned in early Sanskrit writings dating from about 1500 BC. The Romans spread it throughout Europe, and it was one of the first spices to arrive in America.
3.The leaves have a very different taste from the seeds. Some people instead perceive an unpleasant “soapy” taste and/or a rank smell. This perception is believed to be a result of an enzyme
that changes the way they taste cilantro, a genetic trait, but has yet to be fully studied.
4. Cilantro has been used as a folk medicine for the relief of anxiety and insomnia in Iranian folk
medicine.

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What’s In Season: Summer

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Click the image above to read more seasonal articles, recipes and farmer features from Edible Phoenix

Market Recipe: Pesto Potato Salad

Market Recipe: Pesto Potato Saladpotato-salad-recipe

Read More for the Recipe

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Crop of the Week: Carrots

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1. The carrot originated some 5000 years ago in Middle Asia around Afghanistan, and slowly spread into the Mediterranean area.
2. The first carrots were white, purple, red, yellow, green and black – not orange.
3. Carrots were first grown as a medicine not a food.
4. Researchers at the USDA found that those who consumed 2 carrots a day were able to lower their cholesterol levels about 20 percent due to a soluble fiber found in carrots called calcium pectate.

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Market Recipe: Grilled Romaine with Corn Salad

Grilled Romaine and Corn Salad

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Crop of the Week: Squash Blossoms

Squash_Blossom_ppmKeep your eyes out for Squash Blossoms starting to pop up around the market!

Squash blossoms are the flowers produced by any number of vines. Some common examples are zucchini, pumpkin, and other various types of squash. Although considered a vegetable in culinary circles, squash are technically a fruit. Stuff the blossoms with cheese – savory or sweet – and then bake them in the oven.

Check out this Ricotta-Stuffed Squash Blossoms featured in Bon Appetite Magazine

Vendor Feature: Hussein Al Hamka

(Photo by Christina Estes - KJZZ) Farmer Hussein Al Hamka looks forward to learning aquaponics so he can grow his special produce year round.

(Photo by Christina Estes – KJZZ)
Farmer Hussein Al Hamka looks forward to learning aquaponics so he can grow his special produce year round.

We were so excited when we heard Hussein Al Hamka, International Rescue Committee Farmer and our Phoenix Public Market vendor, being interviewed on KJZZ today!  Listen here to learn about the new Aquaponics Incubator Farm at 17th avenue and Camelback.

Read the full article on the KJZZ Website here.

Crop of the Week: Radish

12950343_212824379089525_1893640757_nHere are ten fun facts about our crop of the week!

1. Radishes were first cultivated thousands of years ago in China, then in Egypt and Greece. Radishes were so highly regarded in Greece that gold replicas were made. The radish did not make its way to England until approximately 1548.  By 1629 they were being cultivated in Massachusetts and later distributed throughout the Americas.

2.  Radishes are known to tolerate many soil and environmental conditions and can reach maturity in as little as 20 days from seed. Radishes that taste hot are due primarily to soils that are either too dry or soil temperature is too hot, above 90°F.

3. Americans eat 400 million pounds of radishes each year, most of which is consumed in salads.

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Abby Lee Farms

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Last week we went to meet the growers behind Abby Lee Farms and see their greenhouse operation located less than 7 miles from the Phoenix Public Market.  Specializing in hydroponic tomatoes and cucumbers we were blown away by their 120,000 Sq Ft high-tech growing facility.  Using coconut fiber grow bags and strategic watering equipment, they use significantly less water than traditional growing techniques.  In order to manage the extreme conditions of Phoenix weather, going from frosts to extreme heat – they go off of a tried and true system.  When you’re hot and want to put on a hat, your plants are probably feeling the same way and it’s time to coat the greenhouses with shading paints.

We highly recommend a taste test of the many varieties of tomatoes Abby Lee offers. Grab one of each, slice them up, taste the differences and share your favorite by tagging us on instagram @phxpublicmarket

Read more to meet Neal Brooks & his various growing locations:

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