Don’t Be Part of the Pollution…

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…Be Part of the Solution

Celebrate Earth Day at the Market

We produce roughly 260 MILLION pounds of waste annually.  Althoguh we make attempts to divert that waste from landfills, did you know that 91% of all plastic isn’t recycled? Every year, each American throws out about 1,200 pounds of organic garbage that can be composted. Let’s change that!

We’ve launched a Green Booth in our dining area to help tackle the challenge of sorting waste and we want to encourage our Loyal Locals to help us do the job. Our goal is to spread education and awareness around the issue of diverting waste from landfills and reducing our overall Ecologicl Footprint.

What is your Ecological Footprint? How many planets does it take to support your lifestyle? We challenge you to take the quiz and find out! https://www.footprintcalculator.org/

It’s important to remember these steps when reducing waste…

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Crop of the Week: Mature Spinach

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Spinach is a cool-weather vegetable. Along with other green, leafy vegetables contain an appreciable amount of iron, calcium and vitamins a and k. A fast-growing plant, it yields many leaves in a short time. The variety we’re used to seeing at the grocery stores is known as “baby spinach”.  It’s a softer, sweeter leaf that’s delicious enjoyed fresh and paired with citrus vinaigrette and sliced radishes.  Baby spinach is harvested as early as three weeks. Alternatively, Mature Spinach is harvested 45-60 days. Mature spinach has a richer spinach flavor and is great to cook with because of its texture.

Read more fror trips on shopping, storing and cooking spinach.

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The Impact of Your Donation

Arizona Gives Day | Tuesday, April 2, 2019 | DONATE NOW

Arizona Gives Day helps raise awareness about Arizona nonprofits and the critical role they play in our communities and state. It inspires people to give generously to nonprofits making our state stronger, creating a thriving community for all.  Although Arizona Gives Day takes place only once a year, your contributions continue to support non-profits, and the causes they’re dedicated to, year-round.

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Let’s Talk Dirty

 

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Sign Up for our Community Clean Up March 23rd 7am

The average person throws away nine times their own body weight in waste every year.  As much as 30% of that waste can be composted.  However, more often than not, it ends up in landfills!  Landfills are among the biggest contributors of soil pollution and we can reduce their impact by diverting waste that ends up there.  In fact, roughly 80% of the items buried in landfills could be recycled.

We can do better – the power to divert waste from landfills is in within our control and the effects directly impact our very own communities, towns and families.  At Phoenix Public Market we’re dedicated to reduce waste in our community by increasing our understanding of how to properly sort waste.  Let’s see how much market waste we can divert from landfills…  Is it in you?

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5 Misconceptions About Farmers Markets

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1) Farmer’s Markets are expensive

Some people think that because it is organic, local and ran on a smaller scale means it is more expensive to cover the costs of production and that extra cost is passed on to the consumer. FALSE! Because products at the market are local it means the cost of transporting these goods diminishes. Rather than coming from across the country or even across the world, nearly all of the products you can buy at the Market are coming from less than 50 miles away, which also means goods are fresher. Market items are commonly picked, baked or prepared fresh and do not have to sit in a refrigerated trailer for more than 24 hours before the market.

2) You can shop local products at grocery stores

This is becoming more of a reality; you do not have to go far to find local products from your area. Woohoo!  You may see a number of large grocery stores increasing their supply of locally sourced fruits and vegetables along with a display of local peanut butters, grains and more, making it more accessible for the consumer to eat more sustainably; however, when you come out to the Market, EVERYTHING you shop, eat and enjoy is local. ALL of the produce you shop is sustainably produced and your dollars are going directly to the producer rather than a big box store middle-man.

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We stand for refugee success

At the Open Air Market at Phoenix Public Market, we’re all about helping our community. We help farmers and local businesses get their products to the masses and we help the people of our local community by providing a place where they can easily access those local farmers and businesses to support them. As a nonprofit organization ourselves, we’d like to take a moment to highlight another nonprofit organization we work with that’s making an incredible impact right here in our community as well as around the globe.

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Multi-sensory Market Discoveries [Shishito Shitake Shakedown]

Shopping at a farmers market awakens the senses and makes us realize that the exotic is not so far away. It’s a multi-sensory activity where we learn about, interact with, and become part of our surroundings. This week, we discovered that our favorite restaurant treat is available through a few of our farmers: Shishito Peppers!

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Shishito peppers are said to have originated in Eastern Asia. They are part of the Capsicum species, along with bell peppers and cayenne peppers. These crops generally do great in dry, hot climates and get more flavorful with more sun exposure. Lucky us – we’ve got plenty of that! Recently, shishito peppers have gained popularity and can be found usually as a finger-food appetizer at trendy restaurants. We found ours at Al Hamka Family Farm.

Shishito peppers vary greatly between crops – on the same vine, one may be sweet and mild while the one next to it is savory and spicy. That’s what makes them addictive! One local restaurant named them “Russian Roulette Peppers” because you never know what you’ll get, and if you’re into surprises, you’ll be digging for the hottest in the bowl.

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Since they’re so easy to prepare, why not try them at home? Maybe even on the grill! If you’re extra DIY, a lemon aioli is easily prepared in a blender – add a little smokiness or zing with paprika or apple cider vinegar.

To start our shishito dinner, we first reached for an ice-cold beer. Then, we threw our peppers in a grill basket with some lime juice and zest, garlic, soy sauce, black pepper, and canola oil to coat. We used a microplane for the lime zest and the garlic. They cooked on high heat for about 10 minutes, tossing every four minutes or so to ensure an even char. Next time, we intend to take the char even further than this go-around. Having too many peppers and not enough surface area makes for overcooked peppers without much texture – though never lacking in flavor. A nice blended salsa or sauce could be made with these if they do seem overcooked!

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We paired our shishitos with some shitake mushrooms from Southwest Mushrooms and some frozen potstickers. It made for a great weeknight meal that breaks up the monotony of salads, pastas, and meat-centric roasts. Each bite was definitely spicy! Dinner became a competition of how much heat we could handle…so it was nice to get the occasional mild pepper. Leftovers will go into brown rice with a drizzle of Saucy Lips Pineapple Thai sauce for take-along lunches.

Get inspired next time you’re at the Open Air Market by looking out for produce you don’t see year-round. A long, skinny pepper available by the handful? Ask the farmer what they usually do with it, where it comes from, why it thrives in our climate.

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Multi-sensory Market Discoveries [Lemon Verbena]

Shopping at a farmers market is nothing like shopping at a grocery store. It’s a multi-sensory activity where we learn about, interact with, and become part of our surroundings. This week, we discovered a new-to-us herb: Lemon Verbena!

During the last hour of the market, we happened upon Lemon Verbena at Maya’s Farm. We sniffed at the leaves wondering what it was, though the lemony aspect of it was very obvious. It smelled a little more floral than other herbs at the table, though everything at this booth toes the line between flower, herb, and vegetable.

Maya herself convinced us to take it home and experiment! She told us to make a tea with it by simply adding it to just-boiled water (being sure to take it off the heat once we put the leaves in). Lemon Verbena can also be used in salads, with fish and chicken, and whatever else lemon would otherwise be great with. We grabbed a couple bunches of it along with some of the robust rosemary next to it, and flaunted its beautiful smell to friends we bumped into on the way out of the aisle.

Little did we know…Lemon Verbena is highly medicinal! In its thin and bright green leaves, there is a high concentrate of antioxidant compounds, anti-inflammatory, and anti-spasmodic properties. It even moderates appetite and is a great anti-stress agent.

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The tea was refreshing and floral! We ended up specifically craving it over ice at the end of a long, hot day. But it also just made the house smell amazing! Adding a sprig of rosemary was a good move, giving the tea a bit of nuance and a savory touch. Mint would be a natural addition, too. Having a jar of concentrated Lemon Verbena tea is sure to improve Summer. Next, maybe roasted halibut with asparagus–that would go great with Lemon Verbena!
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Multi-sensory discoveries can be made all over the market. Get the most out of the Open Air Market by opening your senses–smell what you see and listen to what you can feel. Ask a farmer or a fellow shopper about their experience, inquire about the story behind a handmade good and truly connect with your local commerce.
Be sure to share your findings with us and the market community on Instagram and Facebook with #lettucemeatdowntown!

Locally Sourced + Market Approved

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One of our favorite things at the Market is the fact we get to meet the growers and producers, ask questions and learn how our foods and products are grown and made.  Traceability is important, we should know where our food comes from just the same we like to know it’s organic.  We should be able to see and understand the food chain and what we’re buying and consuming.

Look our new for the Locally Sourced badge at the Market! 

Vendors offering products featuring more than 50% locally-sourced ingredients are being awarded “Phoenix Public Market Approved” badges.  In addition to the nutritional and health benefits, choosing these products keeps even more money in the local economy, leading to a healthier sustainable community.

We have power as consumers and where we choose to use our spending power makes an impact! When you choose to shop local you support.

We love sharing all of the wonderful reasons shopping local is so valuable to our community! Want to read more?  Check out these past blog posts: Why Shop Local?
The Importance of Shopping Local Growers and Producers

Prepare for Citrusocolypse

It’s every Arizonan’s duty to be able to recite the 5 C’s like the ABC’s: Cotton, Copper, Cattle, Climate, and CITRUS!

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In the early years of Arizona’s history, citrus was a major player in the fate of Arizona’s economy. Citrus was brought over to the Southwest in the 18th century by Spanish settlers. As grapefruit in particular gained popularity during the 1930s, more than 1 million crates of grapefruits were produced by our state in the year of 1935.

The industry flocked to Arizona, landing mainly in the Arcadia and Mesa areas, where many groves are landmarks for historic neighborhoods. The sprawl of these neighborhoods and urban areas in general encroaching on farmland is largely why orchards declined heavily in the 1990s.

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Our warm and sunny climate creates a perfect incubator for sweet, juicy citrus of many varieties. Today, shoppers at Phoenix Public Market can find tangelos, kumquats, ruby reds, and so much more in overwhelming abundance at every grower’s stand. The ubiquity of citrus in our Phoenician lives can make the fruit mundane and cumbersome, but there are plenty of ways to enjoy it and reap the nutritional benefits–it’s time to get creative!

Read on for 4 ways get excited about our prolonged and plentiful citrus season…

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