Sip on this…

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Pour Jo Coffee makes a strong case for great coffee with delicious drinks and their friendly family-run business.  You may know the crew at Pour Jo Coffee for their truck, offering a full espresso bar along with hot and iced coffee and teas. However, do you know just how strong that drink is for the community?

 

Pour Jo Coffee exemplifies forward-thinking retailers who are increasingly keen to engage in true partnerships with their local suppliers.  Their truck and menu boasts a range of local purveyors you can’t resist.

 

You can find the coffee crew shopping around the Market first thing in the morning to grab fresh fruits, Absolutely Delightful honey or Iconic Co. flavors to spice up their drinks.  With coffee locally roasted from Provision Coffee, milk delivered from Danzeisen Dairy and tea blends from Maya Tea company you can be sure you’re enjoying a true local collaboration full of flavor and hard work!  Even their snack offerings come from local company Nut Sack.

 

Pour Jo has definitely proven they are committed to sourcing ingredients from other locals.  Even the plants featured on the truck come from ConCreate Cactus and their tunes to keep the energy up and the drinks flowing… well they blast those from Diamond Boxx Co speakers.

 

The economic tendrils of this movement reach deeper than anyone might imagine.  Read more about the impacts of building strong local food systems here. So the next time you are picking up your coffee on Saturday morning from Pour Jo, think of the blend of local entrepreneurship and community building that goes into each cup.

 

Pour Jo’s Local Purveyors:

Absolutely Delightful Honey
Concreate Cactus
Danzeisen Dairy
Diamond Boxx Co
Iconic Cocktail Co.
Maya Tea
Nut Sack
Provision Coffee

Workshop: Harvesting Carob

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Join us this Saturday, October 22nd at 9am for this free workshop.
Andrew ‘Green Man’ Pisher, is certified in Urban Farming and continually studying Nutrition in order to teach anyone to grow and connect with the right plants for their health and well-being.
In Saturday’s workshop, Green Man will talk about the potential in foraging for a certain super food that grows very well here in the desert. There is a tree that grows a delicious bean that is packed with high levels of essential vitamins, minerals and especially healthy fiber and fats. This tree originally from the Mediterranean area of the world and has been an important food source for humans since the days of the Egyptians. The Carob tree, or Locust Bean tree is not well known in the United States due to the fact that this lovely shade tree only grows in certain climates where temperatures rarely reach below 42 degrees.
Let Green Man show you how to identify the Carob tree so you can find one in your neighborhood. He will teach you how to harvest the pods, remove the seeds and turn into a powder form that you can use in many ways, including: in breads, on oatmeal, in shakes, baked goods, as a chocolate flavor substitute (without added sugar), on cereal and other uses.
Register here for this FREE workshop so we know you will be attending.

Workshop: Raising Goats

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Raising Goats Workshop

Celia Peterson has shared her life with goats for 38 years.  As an infant, goat milk  saved her life.  She was raised on it!  She has made soap and cheese for Farmers Markets for over 10 years.  Celia shares her passion for goats and raising goats with cients and other lovers of this grand species.  Celia lives on Chile Acres Farm with her goat and other critters.

Learn from Celia about goat housing, fencing, feeding, grooming, health issues, natural care of goats, breeding, kidding/birthing, raising kids, disubdding, milking, trimming hooves, sanitation, breeds of goats, and resources (books, internet sources).

You will actually get to watch Celia milk a goat!

Workshop: Growing Healthy Fruit Trees

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Join us for this free workshop at the market on September 10th at 9am. Be sure to pre-register here so we know you are attending.

Greg’s favorite plants to nurture at the Urban Farm are the fruit trees. They appeal to the lazy gardener, as planting a fruit tree once reaps a bounty for many years to come. The selection of fruit trees that you can grow is vast – peaches, apples, apricots, plums, pears, citrus and more – discovering just what works and how to pick a perfect fruit tree for your yard can be perplexing.

Join Greg Peterson as he walks you through the three most important things to know about growing fruit trees in your yard. It REALLY is quite simple. You will learn:
  • The single biggest thing that you need to know when growing fruit trees in the desert
  • Why nurseries of all kinds sell you fruit trees that will never make fruit
  • How to spread out your fruit tree harvest over months rather than weeks
  • A watering technique that virtually guarantees success

SHOP + CHOP + COOK

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Hands On Farmer’s Market Cooking Class with Melanie A. Albert

Shop + Chop + Cook

Learn Unique, Simple Ways to Enjoy Phoenix Public Market Foods at Home

Have fun intuitively creating your own refreshing veggie dishes with Phoenix seasonal veggies. Enjoy hands-on interactive cooking experiences and learn simple culinary techniques to create unique, tasty, beautiful dishes.

Learn: Unique Ways to Create Raw Salad with Local Farmers Phoenix Public Market Veggies

Get tips to shop easily at the farmers market. Mindfully enjoy your creations with our Phoenix community.

Led by intuitive cooking expert, Melanie A. Albert, author of “A New View of Healthy Eating. Simple Intuitive Cooking with Real Whole Foods.”

Meet the instructor…

Read the full story »

Workshop: Harvesting Prickly Pear

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When:

Reserve your spot here.

Start off this Prickly Pear season with a demonstration on how to harvest, process and eat this delicious fruit.  It has amazing health benefits, has a low glycemic index, is rich in vitamins, minerals and electrolytes and so much more.  It’s a great time to start incorporating this abundant food into your life.

Peggy Sorensen has had a passion for the edible and medicinal plants, trees, cacti and common weeds in the southwest for the past 25 years. She has taught classes and lead foraging events and plant walks around the valley.  She recently finished a year-long herbal intensive course that took her hiking in the deserts and mountains of Arizona and New Mexico where she learned over 100 medicinal plants.

Crop of the Week: Okra

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We love this image Hip Veggies (Monika Woolsey) captured.

 

  1. Okra is a member of the Mallow family, related to cotton, hibiscus and hollyhock.

2. In other parts of the world, this functional vegetable is also known as gumbo or lady fingers.

3. The pods, when cut, exude a mucilaginous juice that is used to thicken stews (like gumbo), and have a flavor somewhat like a cross between asparagus and eggplant.

4. Okra probably originated somewhere around Ethiopia, and was cultivated by the ancient Egyptians by the 12th century B.C.

5. Okra seeds have been toasted, ground and used a coffee substitute for centuries.

Read the full story »

Desert Foraging with Mark Lewis

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Weeds in your yard or edible wildflowers?

Mark Lewis is the man about town who can teach you.   With over 150 years knowledge of Southwest foraging passed down through the generations in his family (dating back to his grandfather’s grandfather!) he has been foraging 2000 edible and 500 medicinal plants throughout Arizona and the Sonoran/Baja Southwest.  With his forty five years direct foraging experience and economic botany background, Mark enjoys teaching at the University and has been presenting and offering his knowledge and finds to the public at local markets and events.  Discover the natural (and edible) world around you, receive horticultural advice and more this weekend at the market when we host Mark Lewis.

So just what can be foraged in our desert…

Read the full story »

The Importance of Bees

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  • Honey bees are accurately described as indispensable pollinators.  In the United States it is estimated that managed honey bee colonies are annually responsible for the pollination of agricultural crops valued between $4 and $8 billion.
  • Bees that are about 21 days old, begin to take short orientation flights, marking the beginning of a 2 to 3 week life as a forager bee, seeking nectar and pollen to bring back to the colony.
  •  While a worker bee is in a flower gathering nectar, pollen often sticks to her hairy body. Because the bee generally visits a number of the same type of flower, she will rub some of the pollen off onto another flower and complete pollination
  • During chillier seasons, worker bees can live for nine months. But in the summer, they rarely last longer than six weeks—they literally work themselves to death.
  • When aging bees do jobs usually reserved for younger members, their brain stops aging. In fact, their brain ages in reverse.

Read the full story »

The Importance of Crop Diversity

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Native Seeds/SEARCH is a vital leader in the Southwest region for conserving and promoting crop diversity to strengthen community resilience and food security.  The mission of Native Seeds/SEARCH (Southwestern Endangered Aridland Resources Clearing House) is to conserve, distribute, and document the adapted and diverse varieties of agricultural seeds, their wild relatives and the role these seeds play in cultures of the American Southwest and northwest Mexico.

Crop diversity is key to achieving sustainable food security both globally and within our own region of focus, the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico. NS/S approach to food security focuses on seed security, which relies on the conservation and sharing of appropriate crop diversity and the knowledge to use that diversity effectively. Their programs are designed to address these goals and broadly entail:

  • Seed banking to ensure the survival of unique agricultural biodiversity and to document its traits.
  • Seed distribution so that these crops continue to contribute to the region’s food systems.
  • Support for on-farm maintenance of dynamically-evolving crop varieties.
  • Research into low-input and climate-appropriate agricultural practices.
  • Education in managing local crop diversity and contributing to regional efforts.

Learn more this weekend at the market where we will be hosting Native Seeds/SEARCH for a FREE workshop starting at 9am.

Find more ways to get involved with their organization here: http://www.nativeseeds.org/get-involved