The Biology Behind Plants To Drive Away Pests

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The Biology Behind Plants That Drive Away Common Pests guest written by Richard Gillespie

Looking for some eco-friendly ways to get rid of pests in your garden? Why not give pest-repellent plants a try? Certain plants have finely tuned defenses to protect themselves from attack. By understanding the biology behind these defensive strategies, you can put them to work for you.

Scents That Make Sense

Many plants use chemical compounds to drive away pests. Some of these compounds scramble the scent receptors insects use to find them. Other plants use scent on its own to scare off pests. Herbs such as basil, rosemary, oregano, mint, and thyme are good examples. We love these tasty, aromatic herbs in our food, but bugs find them repulsive.

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Community Blood Drive

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10 Health Benefits of Garlic

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Sure, pre-shelled and processed minced garlic is convenient but fresh garlic used in your foods has some pretty significant health benefits. Shop locally-grown garlic at the market this season.

10 Proven Health Benefits of Garlic

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Market Guide to Spring Allergies

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Yes, it’s that time again—flowers blooming, bees buzzing and lots of sneezing—the all-too-familiar sights and sounds of spring. If you have pollen allergies, spring can be miserable times. You can suffer with itchy eyes, a runny nose, congestion, sinus problems and sneezing—or you can numb your brain and reflexes with over-the-counter or prescription drugs. Maybe it’s time to consider an alternative. Making some minor modifications to your eating habits and picking up some of these handy market items might help relieve some of your symptoms

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Give a Pint + Get a Discount

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Top 5 Market Habits for a Healthy New Year

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Kick off 2019 with these five fresh habits to support a positive lifestyle.
1. EAT GOOD FOOD – This doesn’t just mean eating more fruits and vegetables (although that never hurts). It means knowing where your food came from, who made it and what’s in it. It means knowing that your pastry was baked with locally sourced heritage grains, Arrandale Farm eggs and Beetanical honey. It means knowing that your chorizo and sausage are coming from all natural, free range and grass fed meats. It means cooking at home with friends and family and enjoying a fresh meal full of flavor.

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Top Ten Season Essentials to Staying Healthy

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Stock up on our Top Ten Season Essentials to Staying Healthy

Fresh Citrus (get those vitamins)
Lotus Gypsy Organic Tea (replenish and relax)
Beetanicals Bee Pollen (build your immune system)
Rad Juices (refuel with these power packed juices)
Garden Goddess Ferments Kvass (feel good on the inside)
H2e Aromatherapy Essential Oil Blends (to relax)
SW Herb Plant Healing Remedies (to stay balanced)
AZ Honey and Propolis Lozenges (fight off scratchy throats)
Studio 11 Sea Salt Scrub (wash away impurities)
Ahima Essentials Moisturizing Creams (keep skin soft)

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“Made From Scratch Makes a Difference”

Kari Snodgrass first tried making some body care products when she was in high school, after her sensitive skin reacted to products bought in stores. It wasn’t until several years later when she considered turning it into a business.

“I didn’t even know you could make your own soap,” she said about her high school experiment.
Just cut soap bars

Now, Kari works full time running Studio 11 Soap, a soap and body care business, that primarily sells at the Phoenix Public Market.

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Get the Most Out of Your Gourd

Fall is finally here! Even in the concrete jungle where the forecast still says 97 degrees, it’s time to celebrate! This Saturday at the market, Downtown Phoenix can enjoy a celebration of all things Autumn as we cozy up into a new season. At the market, there will be a costume contest, pumpkin carving station, Open Air scavenger hunt, pumpkin displays for adorable photo-ops, and pumpkin patches with a variety of Phoenix-grown pumpkins to take home. Of course, shoppers can also pick up fall flavors at almost every vendor booth, as well as market-roasted chiles for what bubbles in the cauldron at home.

All this fun begs the question: once the great pumpkin is chosen and does its decorative duty at the doorstep–what’s next? Cut it open and roast the seeds, leaving the body for compost? Use it as a doorstop in the home and see how long it lasts before rotting from the inside out? Find the local trebuchet and see how far it’ll go? Maybe we can suggest something better:

homemade pumpkin puree!

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Some Like it Raw

Walking the farmers market can be a very inspiring journey. In each aisle, shoppers might find a fruit they’ve never tasted, maybe a condiment they’ve never thought of, or perhaps even a dog on a skateboard scooting by. For Kenny Hadley, the market inspired a total lifestyle change.

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Kenny has been a volunteer at the Community Exchange Table (CET) for nine years. Now, Kenny is known as the booth manager. His family, of Hadley Farmship, helped start the club through a local permaculture group. The operation is run completely by volunteers, and featured neighborhood growers and makers keep 80% or 90% of their profits (depending on the market they’re selling at).

The CET lately features the Orchard Community Learning Center, Sundown Ranch, two independent neighborhood locals who grow fruit and make all-natural beauty products, as well as Hadley Farmship. Growers and makers set their own prices. The Hadley’s also produce “Mom’s Tortillas.” Produce ranges from the exotic non-edibles that will catch shoppers’ eyes, such as loofah and pine-cones, to the all-familiar basil (bags of which they famously sell for just $1). Often, heritage seeds are sold next to the fruit they produce. Kenny recalls seeing huge stalks of sugarcane for sale at one market, but maintains that tart and sweet mulberries from their table are still the best thing he’s ever eaten in Phoenix.

Kenny’s perspective on produce in Phoenix is especially viable due to the fact that he has been eating exclusively raw vegan foods for five years this October. After watching “Food Inc.” in 2008, he had worked to cut “bad” foods from his diet progressively until 2012. At that point, Kenny was inspired to attempt a 10-day all-raw challenge by a fellow vendor at the market after hearing how great much it improved their overall well-being. His 10-day challenge became a life challenge.

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