Fun Fig Facts

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We love so many things about figs including enjoying them fresh, dicing them into oatmeal, topping pizzas with them and slicing them with savory cheese. But we also love these

Top Ten Fun Facts About Figs

1. Figs are actually a flower and not a fruit.
2. In ancient Greece, figs were regarded with such esteem that laws were created forbidding the export of the best quality figs.
3. Fig trees have no blossoms on their branches.
4. Fig puree can be used to replace fat in baked goods.
5. Fossil records date figs back to between 9400-9200 B.C.
6. Figs are harvested according to nature’s clock, fully ripened and partially dried on the tree.
7. Figs are high in fiber and a great source of potassium. They’re also rich in nutrients like vitamin K.
8. They’re considered a part of the mulberry family.
9. Figs made their first commercial US product appearance with the introduction of Fig Newtons cookies in 1892.
10. Figs are known as the “fruit of the gods”.

Prepare for Citrusocolypse

It’s every Arizonan’s duty to be able to recite the 5 C’s like the ABC’s: Cotton, Copper, Cattle, Climate, and CITRUS!

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In the early years of Arizona’s history, citrus was a major player in the fate of Arizona’s economy. Citrus was brought over to the Southwest in the 18th century by Spanish settlers. As grapefruit in particular gained popularity during the 1930s, more than 1 million crates of grapefruits were produced by our state in the year of 1935.

The industry flocked to Arizona, landing mainly in the Arcadia and Mesa areas, where many groves are landmarks for historic neighborhoods. The sprawl of these neighborhoods and urban areas in general encroaching on farmland is largely why orchards declined heavily in the 1990s.

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Our warm and sunny climate creates a perfect incubator for sweet, juicy citrus of many varieties. Today, shoppers at Phoenix Public Market can find tangelos, kumquats, ruby reds, and so much more in overwhelming abundance at every grower’s stand. The ubiquity of citrus in our Phoenician lives can make the fruit mundane and cumbersome, but there are plenty of ways to enjoy it and reap the nutritional benefits–it’s time to get creative!

Read on for 4 ways get excited about our prolonged and plentiful citrus season…

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The Benefits of Butternut

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As cooler temperatures roll in, we’re getting excited for a whole new season of fresh produce for fall and winter.  Butternut Squash is a favorite winter squash variety to cook with because of it’s slightly sweet flavors and creaminess.  Chop and roast for an easy side dish or simmer for soup, but we challenge you to think outside the box and add this colorful veggie into a variety of meals.  This season cook up everything from creamy risotto to crispy fries.  Tag us in your favorite recipes @phxpublicmarket

Low in fat, butternut squash delivers an ample dose of dietary fiber, making it an exceptionally heart-friendly choice. It provides significant amounts of potassium, important for bone health, and vitamin B6, essential for the proper functioning of both the nervous and immune systems.

Discover more reasons to eat this super food online here.

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This week’s Taste of the Market, C-CAP Arizona and 9 Degrees North Catering chefs will show us how to select, prepare and store squash.  Learn how to make creamy Butternut Squash Pasta Sauce and pick up ingredients like handmade pasta from Decio Pasta, mix in extra veggies and power up the protein by adding your favorite meat.

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What’s In Season: Late Summer

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As August winds down and we move into September, farmers are busy cleaning up their fields and preparing to plant fall crops.  September finds us in transition between summer produce and waiting for cooler weather fall vegetables.

So what can you anticipate to find at the Market in late summer? 

September is a peak for many crops right here in the Valley such as chiles, okra and summer squash.   In addition, areas outside of the Valley are coming into high season.  You will see apples, tomatoes, corn, melons and peaches coming to us from areas like Prescott, Flagstaff and Wilcox area.

Apples
Arugula
Basil
Black-eyed peas
Chard
Chiles
Corn
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Figs (late crop)
Green Beans
Herbs
Melons
Okra
Peaches
Peppers
Potatoes
Pumpkins
Summer Squash (and blossoms)
Tomatoes
Winter Squash (Spaghetti, Acorn, Butternut)
Zucchini