13 years ago…

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The Phoenix Public Market is about to complete its 13th year of operation.  It was a dream envisioned by Cindy Gentry, an urban center-point where farmers and local businesses who did not have stores or big contracts could bring their products to the people of Arizona.

The idea was to create a non-profit market that champions Arizona products made by people who wanted to build their own business.  After much hard work by Cindy, that dream began on a rainy Saturday in February 2005.  About 14 vendors and a few more customers showed up the first day, along with then Mayor Phil Gordon and Councilman Michael Johnson, two of the earliest supporters, who rang the bell to get the day started.

Not only did it rain that first day, but the second day as well.  However, Cindy with all the vendors and volunteers kept the faith and just kept plugging along.  That faith and perseverance shown by everyone involved led to the ongoing growth in customers, vendors, and sales. Now, most Saturdays, there are 80+ vendors and 1,500+ customers.  The Phoenix Public Market has become a bedrock in Downtown Phoenix for people who come from the surrounding neighborhoods and often more than 20 miles away.

THANK YOU to everyone for supporting the Phoenix Public Market and your local community!

Market Recipe: Orange Glazed Radish

“Made From Scratch Makes a Difference”

Kari Snodgrass first tried making some body care products when she was in high school, after her sensitive skin reacted to products bought in stores. It wasn’t until several years later when she considered turning it into a business.

“I didn’t even know you could make your own soap,” she said about her high school experiment.
Just cut soap bars

Now, Kari works full time running Studio 11 Soap, a soap and body care business, that primarily sells at the Phoenix Public Market.

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The stakes are high this Super Bowl Sunday…

Burger Throw Down

Phoenix Public Market is challenging customers and Loyal Local friends to a Burger Throwdown. Think you have what it takes to go down in glory with savory success?

To win, all you have to do is…

  1. Shop for key ingredients at the Market
  2. Create a Burger Recipe featuring those ingredients that is unique and irresistible
  3. Share photos of your process and final product

Please e-mail submissions to openair@phxpublicmarket.com

  • Subject Line: BURGER THROWDOWN
  • Submissions should include:
    • Name, Phone Number, Recipe, Photos of burgers
  • Pictures of the fun you have crafting your submission are a major bonus!

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Plastic Bag Recycling

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You can now recycle your plastic bags at the Phoenix Public Market! Find our plastic bag collection bin near the Information Booth. Feel free to drop off clean and dry plastic films such as: Grocery/carryout bags, newspaper delivery bags, dry cleaning bags and department store bags.

Those plastic grocery bags can have more than one life when you place them in the recycling bin. Shoppers can reuse bags while shopping at the Market. In addition, plastic bags can be recycled into new materials. The process involves chipping the bags into pellets. While pellets can then be reprocessed into new bags, they will most likely be shipped to companies to be manufactured into plastic lumber.

Prepare your bags for recycling:

  1. Remove anything inside the bags, such as receipts, stickers or crumbs. All these items will contaminate your bag load.
  2. Keep a bag collection bin in your house, such as one big garbage bag for all bags. Since they compact easily, you should be able to fit 50 to 100 plastic bags in one garbage bags.

Do your part to reduce and reuse waste in our community.
Help facilitate consumer choice while reducing environmental contamination!  You can also find wonderful Market bags to purchase at the Market and use week after week to fill with your favorite Market goodies!

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Crop of the Moment: Bok Choy

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A staple in Asian cooking, this round-leafed vegetable may be less familiar to American cooks. Here’s what you need to know — including what its name means, how to wash it, and how to use it.

1. Bok Choy’s Name
Bok choy is sometimes referred to as white cabbage, not to be confused with Napa cabbage, which is also a type of Chinese cabbage. There are many kinds of bok choy that vary in color, taste, and size, including tah tsai and joi choi. You might also find bok choy spelled pak choi, bok choi, or pak choy.

2. Its Plant Family
Bok choy might look a lot like celery, but it’s a member of the cabbage family.

3. History
The Chinese have been cultivating the vegetable for more than 5,000 years.

4. Where It’s Grown
Although the veggie is still grown in China, bok choy is now also harvested in America and parts of Canada.

5. Cooking It
Bok choy, known for its mild flavor, is good for stir-fries, braising, and soups. You can also eat it raw. Try this delicious and easy recipe from Bon Appetit

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Is Phoenix ready for Phoestivus

Next week, the cast of characters that complete the downtown Phoenix holiday scene are coming together to create the 8th annual PHOESTIVUS CELEBRATION!

We’ll welcome Phreddie the Yeti

Hipster Santa

The Bookman’s gift-wrapping elves

phestive entertainment on the KJZZ Soundbite Stage

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We’ll experience the wrath of Arizona Storytellers with the annual airing of Phoenician grievances

The Pheats of Strength hammer

And the magic of real(ish) reindeer born and bred in Phoenix

All alongside your favorite Phoenix artisans, so you can do your part in our local economy and fight the commercialism of the holidays!

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Strength in Numbers (of Conscious Shoppers)

With all the local marketplaces and events this time of year, those of us who are embedded in our community of local do-ers and movers don’t necessarily need an annual tradition boosted by a credit card company to remember the importance of supporting local economy. Still, Small Business Saturday is another one of those special days each year that we love, appreciate, and look forward to.

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According to the National Retail Federation, about 164 million consumers are expected to shop on Black Friday in 2017. For the seventh year, Small Business Saturday plans to redirect some of those shoppers to local businesses across the country rather than big-box retailers. For every $100 spent at a local business, $43 stays in local economy, whereas only $13 stays in local economy if spent at a non-locally-owned business.

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Market Recipes: Thanksgiving Favorites

True Thanksgiving Tradition- Eating Local

There’s nothing wrong with family traditions, but it’s easy and fun to give those old favorites new life with fresh, locally raised foods. Thanksgiving is the perfect time to choose from autumn’s bountiful cornucopia of locally grown foods from salad greens to root vegetables. The most traditional Thanksgiving menu has its roots in local, seasonal foods.

And there’s even more to be thankful for, because local foods, when grown without synthetic chemicals, enhance our personal health, the health of our farmers, their farms, and our communities. And the virtuous circle expands as local organic foods benefit the soil, air, and water upon which life depends. We’re proud to host three certified organic farmers, along with another ten local farmers who practice sustainable, healthy growing techniques.  Talk to your farmers at the Market, ask questions about how they grow their foods and discover tips on how to prepare the produce at home into the perfect holiday dish.
Check out some of our favorite Thanksgiving sides…
and Italian Heat Apple Stuffing
stuffing

Making Your Garden a Buffet for Bees

The Best Gardening Tips to Make Your Landscape Irresistible to Bees
Article By Guest Contributor Christy Erikson, Saving Our Bees

Bees are our most beneficial pollinators. You can create a bee-friendly environment whether you tend a patio garden, are involved with a community garden, or plant a backyard habitat. Get started with these great gardening tips.

bee-1575236_1280 Image courtesy of Pixabay

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