Market Recipe: Pumpkin Seeds

This is the perfect weekend to pick up a pumpkin and start carving!
Stop by Saturday and enter our pumpkin carving contest.
Show us your best work and be entered to win market prizes and bragging rights.

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Take home your seeds and try one of these delicious recipes
or pick up your favorite spice blends from Carefree Spice Company or RA Seasonings for an easy and delicious season treat!

Sweet & Salted Roasted Pumpkin Seeds from ForkKnifeSwoon.com (pictured above)

Maple Pumpkin Fall Trail Mix by SlimPickinsKitchen.com

Drunken Pumpkin Seeds at SweetCDesigns.com

Classic Roasted Pumpkin Seeds on TheLemonBowl.com

What’s In Season: Fall

screen-shot-2016-10-20-at-3-29-26-pmClick the image above to read more about seasonal produce, local restaurants, and delicious recipes from Edible Phoenix.

Workshop: Harvesting Carob

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Join us this Saturday, October 22nd at 9am for this free workshop.
Andrew ‘Green Man’ Pisher, is certified in Urban Farming and continually studying Nutrition in order to teach anyone to grow and connect with the right plants for their health and well-being.
In Saturday’s workshop, Green Man will talk about the potential in foraging for a certain super food that grows very well here in the desert. There is a tree that grows a delicious bean that is packed with high levels of essential vitamins, minerals and especially healthy fiber and fats. This tree originally from the Mediterranean area of the world and has been an important food source for humans since the days of the Egyptians. The Carob tree, or Locust Bean tree is not well known in the United States due to the fact that this lovely shade tree only grows in certain climates where temperatures rarely reach below 42 degrees.
Let Green Man show you how to identify the Carob tree so you can find one in your neighborhood. He will teach you how to harvest the pods, remove the seeds and turn into a powder form that you can use in many ways, including: in breads, on oatmeal, in shakes, baked goods, as a chocolate flavor substitute (without added sugar), on cereal and other uses.
Register here for this FREE workshop so we know you will be attending.

SHOP + CHOP + COOK

41Many of us have become so used to the convenience of dining out, picking up food or even ordering food in. Sustainable Table gives us three motivations to start rethinking our habits and get cooking at home.

  1. The economics of cooking at home:  Home cooking beats all of the competition hands down when it comes to saving money. Whether you’re considering dining out or bringing home prepared food, you’re paying for someone else to do something you can do yourself — and, with a little practice, probably do better. At a restaurant, you’re spending money on the cost of running somebody’s business, including rent and payroll. By the same token, purchasing prepared food from the grocer’s freezer involves paying for the processing, packaging, and advertising of that product — none of which adds value to the food itself.
  2. The flavor game: We’re losing our palates to our industrialized food system. Not so long ago, herbs and spices and sugar were used to enhance the flavor in our food. But in recent decades our taste buds have been corrupted through the use of cheap chemicals and corn syrup to fill that role. We’ve forgotten how wonderfully delicious fresh food tastes as we’ve become acclimated to food that’s polluted with preservatives. The more you cook, the more you’ll learn that sustainable, local ingredients just taste better. Let the food do some of the work for you. Take back your palate so you can take back your plate!
  3. You are in control: Think about what you” want to find in tonight’s dinner. You have control over the nutritional value of the foods you prepare. Locally grown food is fresher by definition, which also means it’s more nutritious. Cooking methods also count. For example, roasting a vegetable will preserve vitamins that are wasted by boiling it; retaining the peel on many fruits and vegetables provides additional vitamins. Watching your salt or sugar intake? Keeping an eye on fats or carbohydrates? You’re in control of all these when you cook.

Need some inspiration on where to start or new ideas about what to buy this weekend at the Market and how to create that into something delicious at home?

Melanie Albert joins us again this month her SHOP + CHOP + COOK Cooking Class series at the Market. 

Shop the market with her and learn how to pick the freshest ingredients then get ready to get chopping in this unique hands on cooking class.  Check out Melanie’s new book to take home market fresh recipes that are simple to cook and delicious to enjoy.

Click here to register for the class.

Click here to check out Melanie’s website and book.

 

Why Probiotics?

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Did you know 80% of your immune system is located in your gut and 95% of your serotonin (happy hormone) is manufactured in your intestines?

What’s more, if your digestive system is out of whack, your entire body will suffer. That makes the gut pretty important. Because it’s so important, it’s critical to keep it in the best shape possible.  The health of your gut depends on the amount of good bacteria, known as probiotics, inside of it. Probiotics are found naturally in your gut; however, the amount of good bacteria versus bad bacteria in your gut can often get out of balance.  Stress, pollution, a diet high in sugar or eating too many processed foods will wreak havoc on your body’s good flora. Even taking an antibiotic one time can cause an imbalance.

Read the full story »

Market Map

Each Friday find our new Market Map published on our page This Week At The Market

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Vendor Profile: Clay Madness

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Victoria Fodale and Charles Erb are the artisans behind Clay Madness. The team produces hand built, functional ceramics. Everything is hand made throughout the entire process. Clay Madness does not use molds or pouring, either Charle’s hands or Victoria’s hands touch every piece. The team creates its ceramics in a clay workshop that was started in Victoria’s garage. Clay Madness produces bowls, coffee cups, olive oil bottles, and other functional pieces. Look for market cups coming soon!

If you were at the market last week you may have enjoyed watching Charles Erb demonstrate his hard work and talents on his pottery wheel. Don’t worry, he’ll have another demonstration on October 29th for our Harvest Festival.

Crop of the Week: Okra

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Okra is found in it’s wild state on the alluvial banks of the
Nile and the Egyptians were the first to cultivate it in the basin of the Nile
(12’th century BC). It was propagated then through North Africa to the
Mediterranean and arrived then in the Americas at
Brazil (1658), Dutch Guinea and at New Orleans before extending in the
United States.

Workshop: Raising Goats

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Raising Goats Workshop

Celia Peterson has shared her life with goats for 38 years.  As an infant, goat milk  saved her life.  She was raised on it!  She has made soap and cheese for Farmers Markets for over 10 years.  Celia shares her passion for goats and raising goats with cients and other lovers of this grand species.  Celia lives on Chile Acres Farm with her goat and other critters.

Learn from Celia about goat housing, fencing, feeding, grooming, health issues, natural care of goats, breeding, kidding/birthing, raising kids, disubdding, milking, trimming hooves, sanitation, breeds of goats, and resources (books, internet sources).

You will actually get to watch Celia milk a goat!

Volunteer With Us!

We are currently seeking volunteers to join our team
at Phoenix Public Market

Sign Up Here

Volunteers at the Phoenix Public Market are an integral part of our Market team. Volunteers work with staff to help create a downtown community-gathering place that provides local and healthy shopping. Volunteers should be friendly and excited to engage with market guests.

Volunteers play a key role at the market working on a wide range of tasks. Market Volunteers assist in running our information booth answering questions, providing education and resources, processing sales transactions, maintaining a clean market, as well as, some lifting and moving of equipment. Volunteers should be able and willing to work outdoors.

The Phoenix Public Market runs every Saturday morning, rain or shine, year round. Therefore, volunteers must be able to work Saturdays. Volunteers should be able to dedicate at least one Saturday morning a month to helping out at the market.
Shift times are from 7:30am – 10:30am and 10:15am to 1:15pm.

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