Summer Hours Begin May 19th

SummerHours

Chile Acres Market Tacos

Taco Throw Down By Celia Petersen (Chile Acres)

You may know Celia for her hard work as a local farmer and her varieties of cheeses, duck eggs, gluten free goodies, soaps and hand woven textiles.  Celia has been at the Market since the very first one back in February of 2005!   So.. she definitely knows the Market well and made some mean Market Tacos for our Taco Throwdown!

You can read more about Celia here in this Vendor Profile: Chile Acres.

Taco_Throwdown

Phoenix Public Maket Tacos

Market Shopping List:
Los Muertos Salsa – One Container of LMS Caviar
Carefree Spice Co – Green Chile Spice Blend
Maya’s Farm – Salad greens, finely chopped
Willy’s Tomato & Chile – One Guac Salsa
Fluffy Vegans – Kale Crunchies
YoBro – Microgreens
Chile Acres – Green Chile Goat Cheese
Abby Lee Farms – Two Tomatoes, chopped
Crooked Sky Farm – Two Onions, chopped
Tortirrikas – 12 Corn Tortillas
OHSO Distillery – Vodka (lime or mango flavored)
Limes for juice

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Taco Throwdown!

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We are challenging you, our Loyal Local friends, to a Taco Throw Down.

  1. Shop at the Market
  2. Create a Taco Recipe featuring market ingredients.
  3. Share photos of your tacos and your recipe.

Please e-mail submissions to openair@phxpublicmarket.com

  • Subject Line: TACO THROWDOWN
  • Submissions should include:
    • Name, Phone Number, Recipe, Photos of Tacos

Rules:

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Shout-Out to Our Volunteers

We want to take a moment and acknowledge the humans who dedicate their Saturdays at the Market. Whether it’s once a week or once a month, our volunteers make the Market a special experience each and every week.  It takes a lot of elbow grease to create a smooth, consistent experience every Saturday and we rely heavily on volunteer help!

Our volunteers greet each market-goer with enthusiasm and warmth as they pass through our endearing alley entrance.

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They sweep up with a smile, ensuring that not only our lot and event space is tidy, but that the whole neighborhood is looking its best.

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They take ownership of fun programs, such as the Market Sprouts booth, to make our market well-rounded.

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They represent the market, getting to know the vendors and products, navigating the aisles and directing lost market-goers like it’s truly home.

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They make trips out to farms and commercial kitchens and write up blog posts – on top of their full-time job’s workload – so that we can educate our customers about the heart and process behind the haul. [See Marlys’ great work here]

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They assist vendors and special guests, acting quickly to support market programs and shoppers.

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They are accountants, retired elementary school teachers, high school students, and writers. They come to the market as reprieve from daily life, seeking the familiar smiling faces (and pastries) that will get them through the next 6 days until Saturday rolls around again. They come to the market to be part of something bigger than their bubble, to make an impact and help the community thrive and grow.

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Make your Saturdays something to seriously look forward to – become a market volunteer! There are many positions to fill and we can always use extra hands. We’ll see you soon (in an orange apron)…

APPLY HERE

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A Shout-out to our Growers

Between the weather, the culture and the urban sprawl, being a grower in Phoenix, Arizona is no easy feat. We want to take a moment to recognize the humans that cultivate and tend to the land which grows the food you take home each and every Saturday.

They wake up long before dawn to pack up the goods and display them on tables with labels and a smile.

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They spend hours in the sun on their land, monitoring irrigation, tilling plots, harvesting just-ripened vegetables, and mitigating the strange Sonoran weather conditions.

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They invest their savings in point-of-sales systems, vendor fees, organic certification, and infrastructure construction.

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They are constantly learning and seeking new ways to make their systems work efficiently, get a better yield, and have the best quality product possible–building on generations of skill and expertise.

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They bring the whole family to the market, keeping the farm going for generations and maintaining a farm-to-table culture throughout all age groups.

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They work together, work with their community, and depend on farmers markets to make their hard work truly mean something.

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They provide education and inspiration when it comes to use of the product, helping market-goers try new things and get the nutrition they need.

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They form relationships with local businesses, bringing local produce to chefs and food-lovers all over the valley.

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They encourage us to grow our own food by bringing plant starters and years of know-how.

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They hold farm days and workshops that bring us into their operation and show us the reality of urban agriculture.

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They are families, bands of friends, and bundles of passionate agriculture nerds who look forward to putting in a full day of work in the middle of the city while most people are starting their weekend.

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They don’t cut corners with pesticides or detrimental GMOs, because they know the true value of growing their own food.

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Join us this Saturday for a tribute to our growers at MEET YOUR COMMUNITY: GROWERS EDITION! There will be workshops all day as well as a coffee chat hour from 8am-9am. Network, ask questions and get feedback, or simply shake the hands of your neighbor the farmer!

Locally Sourced + Market Approved

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One of our favorite things at the Market is the fact we get to meet the growers and producers, ask questions and learn how our foods and products are grown and made.  Traceability is important, we should know where our food comes from just the same we like to know it’s organic.  We should be able to see and understand the food chain and what we’re buying and consuming.

Look our new for the Locally Sourced badge at the Market! 

Vendors offering products featuring more than 50% locally-sourced ingredients are being awarded “Phoenix Public Market Approved” badges.  In addition to the nutritional and health benefits, choosing these products keeps even more money in the local economy, leading to a healthier sustainable community.

We have power as consumers and where we choose to use our spending power makes an impact! When you choose to shop local you support.

We love sharing all of the wonderful reasons shopping local is so valuable to our community! Want to read more?  Check out these past blog posts: Why Shop Local?
The Importance of Shopping Local Growers and Producers

Vendor Feature: Pour Jo Coffee

Pour Jo Coffee – Rich in Coffee and Family

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David Martinez doesn’t care if you order a straight double shot of espresso or a large latte with whole milk and extra sweetener. He wants you to have your drink the way you want it.

“If you can make someone’s drink and make their day with that drink,” he said, “then everything else really is irrelevant. If they like a whole lot of foam, no foam at all, 12 sugar packets, whatever, then that’s the right way.”

David and his wife, Frances Martinez, started Pour Jo Coffee, a full cafe on a food truck, about three years ago. After working as a mechanic for years, David started to look for a different line of work: he was experiencing back pain that he knew numbered his days in an automotive career and he wanted to spend more time with his family. Frances’ love for coffee inspired their business plan.

Once the Phoenix couple decided to work towards a coffee business, David tried to immerse himself in the area’s coffee culture. That usually meant dropping by local coffeehouses or cafes in the greasy work clothes he wore as an auto technician.

“We would just get looked at,” he said. People would question his orders, assuming he didn’t understand what he was ordering. “I’m trying to grow my coffee experience and I ran into a lot of people who gave me a hard time about not knowing coffee.”

David used those experiences to educate himself even more about coffee, but doesn’t want his customers at Pour Jo to ever feel the way he did then. The name of the business, in fact, came out of a conversation about how he was seeking a quality coffee for just a “poor joe like me,” he said.

The Pour Jo baristas are glad to educate customers about their coffee and what different espresso drinks are, but they mostly want to serve the drink each person wants, no matter what some coffee etiquette may say.

The Pour Jo crew includes David and Frances and a handful of close friends and family. At the Phoenix Public Market on Saturday mornings, customers will usually see Frances’ sister, Christina Chavez, and Frances and Christina’s brother (and David’s best friend since elementary school), Kevin “Kev” Healy. You’ll recognize David when ordering your coffee by his handlebar mustache, the inspiration for Pour Jo’s logo.

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Prepare for Citrusocolypse

It’s every Arizonan’s duty to be able to recite the 5 C’s like the ABC’s: Cotton, Copper, Cattle, Climate, and CITRUS!

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In the early years of Arizona’s history, citrus was a major player in the fate of Arizona’s economy. Citrus was brought over to the Southwest in the 18th century by Spanish settlers. As grapefruit in particular gained popularity during the 1930s, more than 1 million crates of grapefruits were produced by our state in the year of 1935.

The industry flocked to Arizona, landing mainly in the Arcadia and Mesa areas, where many groves are landmarks for historic neighborhoods. The sprawl of these neighborhoods and urban areas in general encroaching on farmland is largely why orchards declined heavily in the 1990s.

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Our warm and sunny climate creates a perfect incubator for sweet, juicy citrus of many varieties. Today, shoppers at Phoenix Public Market can find tangelos, kumquats, ruby reds, and so much more in overwhelming abundance at every grower’s stand. The ubiquity of citrus in our Phoenician lives can make the fruit mundane and cumbersome, but there are plenty of ways to enjoy it and reap the nutritional benefits–it’s time to get creative!

Read on for 4 ways get excited about our prolonged and plentiful citrus season…

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13 years ago…

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The Phoenix Public Market is about to complete its 13th year of operation.  It was a dream envisioned by Cindy Gentry, an urban center-point where farmers and local businesses who did not have stores or big contracts could bring their products to the people of Arizona.

The idea was to create a non-profit market that champions Arizona products made by people who wanted to build their own business.  After much hard work by Cindy, that dream began on a rainy Saturday in February 2005.  About 14 vendors and a few more customers showed up the first day, along with then Mayor Phil Gordon and Councilman Michael Johnson, two of the earliest supporters, who rang the bell to get the day started.

Not only did it rain that first day, but the second day as well.  However, Cindy with all the vendors and volunteers kept the faith and just kept plugging along.  That faith and perseverance shown by everyone involved led to the ongoing growth in customers, vendors, and sales. Now, most Saturdays, there are 80+ vendors and 1,500+ customers.  The Phoenix Public Market has become a bedrock in Downtown Phoenix for people who come from the surrounding neighborhoods and often more than 20 miles away.

THANK YOU to everyone for supporting the Phoenix Public Market and your local community!

Market Recipe: Orange Glazed Radish